Before and after the fact writing and reading hitchcocks suspicion

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Before and after the fact writing and reading hitchcocks suspicion

Fitzpatrick Alfred Hitchcock's cameo is a signature occurrence in most of his films. In Suspicion, he can be seen approximately 47 minutes into the film mailing a letter at the village postbox.

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The two men wrote the screenplay in seven weeks, with West focusing on characterization and dialogue as Ingster worked on the narrative structure. Harrison was Hitchcock's personal assistant, and Reville was Hitchcock's wife. West and Ingster's screenplay was abandoned and never produced.

The text of this screenplay can be found in the Library of America 's edition of West's collected works. Production[ edit ] Johnnie and Lina in the film. In places, the screenplay of Suspicion faithfully follows the plot of the novel.

However, a number of major differences exist between the novel and its film version. Johnnie Aysgarth's infidelity is not featured in the film: Lina's best friend with whom Johnnie has an affair does not appear at all, and Ethel, their maid, does not have an illegitimate son by Johnnie.

Sex is not made an issue, and only alluded to in a conversation where Johnnie jokes about having kissed dozens of women before meeting Lina. Suspicion illustrates how a novel's plot can be so much altered in the transition to film as to reverse the author's original intention.

De Andrea states in his Encyclopedia Mysteriosa that Suspicion was supposed to be the study of a murder as seen through the eyes of the eventual victim.

before and after the fact writing and reading hitchcocks suspicion

However, because Cary Grant was to be the killer and Joan Fontaine the person killed, the studio — RKO — decreed a different ending, which Hitchcock supplied and then spent the rest of his life complaining about.

Spoto claims that the first RKO treatment and memos between Hitchcock and the studio show that Hitchcock emphatically desired to make a film about a woman's fantasy life.

In both versions, Johnnie freely admits that he would not mind the general's death because he expects Lina to inherit a substantial fortune, which would solve their financial problems. The book, however, is much darker, with Johnnie egging on the general to exert himself to the point where he collapses and dies.

In the film, General McLaidlaw's death is only reported, and Johnnie is not involved at all. Again, Johnnie's criminal record remains incomplete. Several scenes in the film create suspense and sow doubt as to Johnnie's intentions: Beaky's death in Paris is due to an allergy to brandy, which Johnnie knew about.

A waiter who barely speaks English tells the police that Beaky addressed his companion that night as "Old Bean", the way Beaky addressed Johnnie. At the end of the film, Johnnie is driving his wife at breakneck speed to her mother's house. This scene, which takes place after her final illness, is not in the book.

Before the Fact by Francis Iles

The biggest difference is the ending. In Iles' novel, Johnnie serves his sick wife a drink which she knows to be poisoned, and she voluntarily gulps it down. In the film, the drink is not poisoned and can be seen untouched the following morning.

Another ending was considered but not used, in which Lina is writing a letter to her mother stating that she fears Johnnie is going to poison her, at which point he walks in with the milk.

She finishes the letter, seals and stamps an envelope, asks Johnnie to mail the letter, then drinks the milk.Pages in category ‘Articles about Suspicion ()’ The following 37 pages are in this category, out of 37 total.

But as Rick Worland has written about in great detail in the essay Before and After the Fact: Writing and Reading Hitchcock’s Suspicion,” the anecdote doesn’t hold up when scrutinized through the surviving archival material.

While there were certainly doubts about how to conclude the film well into production–something rather atypical.

Before and after the fact: Writing and reading Hitchcock's Suspicion by Rick Worland This article combines a historical investigation with critical analysis of Suspicion (), a film long undervalued because of misinformation about its production history.

He begins to court Lina, and before long, they are married. It is only after the honeymoon that she discovers his true character, and she starts to become suspicious when Johnnie's friend and business partner, Beaky, is mysteriously killed. Before and after the Fact: Writing and Reading Hitchcock's Suspicion Rick Worland Cinema Journal, 41, Number 4, Summer , pp.

(Article). Before and after the Fact: Writing and Reading Abstract. This article combines a historical investigation with critical analysis of Suspicion (), a film long undervalued because of misinformation about its production history.

This essay provides a documented account of Suspicion from novel to screenplay to release, considering issues of.

Category:Articles about Suspicion () - The Alfred Hitchcock Wiki